Does Pimax 12K and 8KX use VVC (H.266) or HEVC (H.265)?

See title, does anyone know? VVC can achieve no loss of quality compared to HEVC at half the bandwidth apparently, if Pimax isn’t onto this they should be.

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They’re not stand alone so no processing. Hopefully the Nvidia 4000 series will support it

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There’s an enormous difference between compression algorithms for videos and compression algorithms for streaming. The reason H.265 and H.266 can be so efficient is because they are handed an entire end-to-end video and get to relate frames to each other backward and forward through time.

Whereas when you’re streaming video, all that you generally have to work with is the difference between the current frame and the next frame. You might be able to get away with storing a couple more frames in a buffer to do some compression magic before sending it on, but the larger the buffer the larger the latency - if you are trying to compress the stream with a four frame buffer, then your user is seeing information that is three frames behind the latest information plus the time it takes to compress, send, and decompress. EDIT: Thinking about it more, I’m sure they just use one-sided information from frames in the past and not future frames, to avoid the added latency.

It’s worth noting that techniques like reprojection can reduce the perceived delay between head movements and visual updates by shifting the image after it’s decompressed, but they can only do so much.

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Yeah h.266 is not the answer. Parsec tries to do this for game streaming (h.265). And it seems impressive at first - until you touch a controller and realize 65ms of lag (minumum due to the way the network/compression works) is just too much. It even gets worse with bandwidth restrictions. A good sounding idea, but streaming video does not equal transport of a game stream. Also it takes dedicated hardware for decode and encode. So h.266 is probably a ways off